Mike Boyd Associate Solicitor

Languages

  • English - English

Office location

Harlesden

17-19 High Street, NW10 4NE

Tel: 020 8961 5146

Summary

Mike is based in our Harlesden office. Mike is an experienced criminal specialist having been qualified since 1979. Mike was for many years the senior criminal partner in Alexander and Partners prior to the merger of Alexander and Partners’ criminal department with EBR Attridge LLP in 2008. Mike is well regarded by fellow professionals and by his clients for his ability to master complex cases, his attention to detail and his commitment to his clients. Mike has a BA in chemistry (Oxon).

Over the past 30 years Mike has dealt with many heavyweight criminal cases including murders, serious drugs offences, serious fraud and money laundering. Mike has Higher Courts rights of advocacy and is a court and police station duty solicitor. He has acted as a consultant to the Ministry of Justice.

Contact Mike Boyd

Mike Boyd can be contacted on 0208 961 5146 or via e-mail: mikeboyd@ebrattridge.com to discuss how he together with other team members at EBR Attridge LLP may be of service.

Experience

Notable case

R-v-M: Central Criminal Court, 2014. M was charged with attempted murder by shooting. The principal evidence consisted of cell-siting of M’s mobile phone and CCTV evidence of M’s car. Acquitted

R-v-L & others: Central Criminal Court 2012. L was one of several defendants charged with the murder by shooting of a man in a take-away restaurant. The case was prosecuted by Operation Trident who alleged that L, and his co-defendants, were gang members and had targeted the victim believing, wrongly, that he was a member of an opposing gang. Much of the prosecution evidence consisted of mobile phone records showing contact at material times between the defendants, cell site and CCTV evidence. Acquitted.

R-v-A and another, Bristol Crown Court 2012. A was charged with the murder of a man shoot dead in an exchange of gunfire between two groups at the Bristol Carnival. The major point in issue was the identity of the gunmen involved who had fled the scene immediately after the shooting.

R-v-W & others: Central Criminal Court 2010. W was charged with conspiracy to murder. This was an Operation Trident prosecution several years after the murder of a man in what was believed to be a gang-related shooting.

R-v-B & others: Kingston Crown Court 2010.Represented B, a company director, charged in a case prosecuted by the Serious Organised Crime Agency. The case related to the laundering of millions of pounds of cash, said to be the proceeds of large-scale cocaine dealing, through money exchange bureaux. The judge directed that the defendant was unfit to stand trial following pre-trial submissions.

R-v-S and others, Kingston Crown Court 2010. In a case brought by the Serious Organised Crime Agency, S was prosecuted in relation to two conspiracies alleging intent to supply large quantities of heroin and cocaine. S defended the proceedings on the basis that he had been recruited by the police to become involved, an assertion strongly denied by the senior officer in charge of the investigation. Acquitted.

R-v-A Central Criminal Court 2009. This was an Operation Trident case in which A was charged with a double murder relating to the fatal shooting of two people in a nightclub. The central prosecution witness was a “supergrass” who came forward after he had himself been convicted of conspiracy to murder (see R v B below). Acquitted

R-v-I and others, Woolwich Crown Court, 2009. Represented I, the lead defendant and central figure in Operation Eaglewood, a £70m money laundering and drugs supply case involving a lengthy covert police surveillance operation. At the time it was said to be the largest case in London handled by the CPS and the Metropolitan police.

R-v-B and others, Central Criminal Court 2007. B was charged with conspiracy to murder in a case brought by Operation Trident relating to the fatal shooting of a man in what was believed to be a gang- related killing. Following B’s acquittal. a convicted co-defendant became a supergrass. Successfully resisted Crown’s application to the Court of Appeal in 2008 for a re-trial on the basis of new and compelling evidence provided by the supergrass.

Latest news

Qc or not QC

 4th Apr 2018

Do I Need a QC?   We are often asked questions about QCs, most probably because the image of leading barristers has been epitomised over the years in leading television dramas such as Silk and Kavanagh QC, it is t... Read more

The Trouble with Your Tenants-Banning Orders

 9th Jan 2018

Landlords to Face Additional Punishment   The government has announced that it intends to bring into force a number of provisions contained in the Housing and Planning Act 2016.   From 6 April 2018 the Act... Read more